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Digital Reading List for INSTG012 Historical Bibliography

August 24, 2015

INSTG012 Reading List screenshot

One of the things that I found most useful from the module in Historical Bibliography that I took at Aberystwyth twenty years ago was the extensive indicative reading list that our tutor, John Turner, gave us. He indicated on it the texts that he had used to prepare lectures and seminars, so it was easy for us to see what we might want to read while we were studying, and, of course, Gaskell was our core text, which we were recommended to buy. Having focused on the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries for my essay choices, I found John’s old reading list really helpful the first time I was working eighteenth century materials as a practitioner, some ten years later.

When I was asked to take on the development and teaching of the equivalent course at UCL, I followed John’s example, and created a similarly extensive reading list for students. So perhaps it’s little surprise that, despite good intentions, it has taken until now to transfer from a series of pdfs to our online reading list system. Spurred on by my upcoming sabbatical, during which the excellent Helen O’Neill will lead the class, I’ve had a final push to publish it online. The latest version of the reading list software allows for sections and also for the use of various levels of recommendation: from “recommended for student purchase” (Gaskell) through “essential” (for the compulsory seminar readings) and “recommended” (which I’ve used to indicate materials I used to write the lectures) to “optional” (for materials that I know are useful, and which students may want to read for interest, for their negotiated essay topic, or, years later, for working with new collections).

I hope the new presentation of the list, with the direct links to the catalogue and SFX links to materials for which UCL holds online subscriptions, will be helpful for the class of 2015-16.

If you’re interested in seeing the list, it’s online here now, although, no doubt I’ll make a few tweaks once I’ve proof-read it next week (with, hopefully, enough distance from time of construction to spot the inevitable typos). INSTG012 Historical Bibliography runs throughout the Autumn term on Monday afternoons.

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Workshop Recap: FRBR for Art Librarians

July 30, 2015
Screenshot of Padlet for FRBR for Art Librarians

Screenshot of Padlet for FRBR for Art Librarians

I was really pleased to be given the opportunity by ARLIS to rerun the workshop on FRBR for Art Librarians that I originally put together and led in 2012. This time it took place at the University of the Arts London at Elephant and Castle, which was an excellent venue with a well-lit and well-serviced computer cluster.

As it’s been 3 years since the last workshop, I updated the resources to reflect more recent developments, and the slides to look to the future, including BIBFRAME, and was also able to use Padlet to share files and links. For those not familiar with Padlet, it’s a free program that allows the creation of a page with links, photos and other files. A feature that I’ve used a lot with classes at UCL and Malta is the ability for everyone with access to the shared Padlet to post to it, but for this particular workshop, I simply used it to create a page with the online materials for the one day workshop, in the way that I use the VLE at work for flipped classes.

As usual with flipped workshops, we were able to cover more material, so as well as looking at The English PatientHarry Potter and the Goblet of Fire and Scherzo, we had time to discuss The Heart of Midlothian and explore OCLC’s FictionFinder. If you’re not yet familiar with FRBR yourself, or are looking for online resources to assist in familiarising staff with the FRBR model, I commend all of these resources to you. Chapter 9 of Cataloguing and Decision Making in a Hybrid Environment (forthcoming) includes a long list of free online materials that can be used or adapted for training and development work, and as its publication date draws nearer I’ll post in more detail about some of them on this blog.

Slides from the workshop presentation have been uploaded to the UCL repository, but as at August 2015 are not yet available on UCL Discovery (“awaiting review” in RPS). The link to them will appear here as soon as the repository review process has been completed. Slides from 2012 are available in Discovery, and there is a blog post to accompany them here.

Many thanks, again, to the ARLIS UK and Ireland committee for asking me to repeat this event.

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Posted in August 2015.

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Student Publication: Making an Exhibition of Ourselves

July 17, 2015

One of the real privileges of my job is supervising student dissertations. This one was a real highlight last year, and made a real contribution to the literature on special collections exhibition work. It’s great that Dot has taken it through the peer review process and it is now available online and in print:

Dorothy Fouracre (2015). Making an Exhibition of Ourselves?: Academic Libraries and Exhibitions Today. Journal of Academic Librarianship 41(4) : 377-385. doi:10.1016/j.acalib.2015.05.008

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Posted in August 2015.

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Conference Recap: Core Future Concepts for Current Cataloguers

July 3, 2015
CILIP 2015

One of the grandest venues at which I’ve spoken: St George’s Hall, Liverpool.

Garea Garcia, N., Welsh, A., Bikakis A., Mahony S., Inskip C., Vogel M. (2015) Core Future Concepts for Current Cataloguers. Presented at: CILIP Conference 2015, Liverpool.

Abstract
The Linked Open Bibliographic Data project at UCL is developing an Open Educational Resource to enable the teaching and learning of BIBFRAME, the new RDF-based framework designed to take over from MARC. A new bibliographic dataset based on BIBFRAME, which will be linked with other online datasets, has been created for that purpose. The learning resource, which will be publicly available under an open licence on completion, will allow learners to access, explore, query and update the dataset through an intuitive interface built on top of the SPARQL query language. This masterclass shares experience in converting MARC records to BIBFRAME using the Library of Congress’s conversion tools [http://bibframe.org/tools/]. More fundamentally, it provides examples of how our model for Cataloguing is changing from linking record:record to field:field. Using publication data from library academics, we’ll look at what’s new in BIBFRAME and why this matters. Finally, we’ll discuss the extent to which those responsible for inputting data may (or may not) need to get to grips with the new data structure and ways that the enthusiastic can keep up.
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Posted in August 2015.

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Holiday Recap: Manchester

April 20, 2015

Spent what would have been Dad’s birthday weekend in Manchester. Beautiful city, as always. Our preoccupations with memory and loss may have been reflected in the photos:

The Lost Gardens of Manchester at Manchester Art Gallery

The Lost Gardens of Manchester at Manchester Art Gallery

Cornelia Parker. War Room (2015)

Cornelia Parker. War Room (2015)

Cai Guo-Qiang. Unmanned Nature

Cai Guo-Qiang. Unmanned Nature

Cai Guo-Qiang. Unmanned Nature

Cai Guo-Qiang. Unmanned Nature

Susan MacMurray. Caryatids

Susan MacMurray. Caryatids

Susan MacMurray. Caryatids

Susan MacMurray. Caryatids

Shabti, Manchester Museums.

Shabti, Manchester Museums.

Lost balloons, Manchester Central Library

Lost balloons, Manchester Central Library

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Posted in August 2015.

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Conference Recap: Product Development and the Connected Curriculum

April 13, 2015

Title slide

The first output from our E-Learning Development Grant funded project, Linked Open Bibliographic Data, was a table-top session at UCL’s own Teaching and Learning Conference:

Product Development and the Connected Curriculum

This paper highlights the synergy between the Connected Curriculum and standard product development within a multidisciplinary team and explores student involvement in the co-creation of knowledge necessary to bring a product (an Open Educational Resource) to completion.

Product development is knowledge-intensive and often multidisciplinary. As well as providing different perspectives, such teams are both synergistic and risk-taking, because any new product requires knowledge to be applied to problem-orientated situations. Multidisciplinarity is viewed by some as fundamental to project success and may also be beneficial because communication between different team members requires the conversion of tacit knowledge (within their home discipline) to explicit knowledge.

In this case study, we explore how these attributes of product development are a natural fit for the Connected Curriculum, focusing on the Student Systems Developer role in a project funded by an e-Learning Development Grant within the Department of Information Studies. We highlight how the presence of a student has strengthened innovation by introducing a fresh set of insights, unencumbered by entrenchment in research and teaching in one discipline. We foreground our learning for the next stage: working with 16 students as product testers.

Our Student Systems Developer is one of the presenters, pointing out how her learning is developing through enquiry; how she connects with us as staff, and with the student product testers; the connections she is making across subjects; and how she is learning to produce outputs – both the programming for the product itself and presentations for a range of conferences and journals.

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Posted in August 2015

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Article Recap: Work in Progress: the Linked Open Bibliographic Data Project

March 30, 2015

Cataloguing Models

Welsh, A., Bikakis, A., Garea Garcia, N., Mahony, S., Inskip, C., Vogel, M. (2015). Work in Progress: the Linked Open Bibliographic Data Project. Catalogue and Index, (178), 17-21.

Abstract
Reports on the first stage of a project to create an Open Educational Resource for the teaching of new cataloguing format BIBFRAME. Collaborative creation of knowledge with students is a key aspect of the project, and this is discussed in the context of UCL’s Connected Curriculum.
Note
Full text of the article has been lodged on the UCL Repository, but as at August 2015 was not yet available on UCL Discovery (RPS status showing as “under review”). It is, however, available in Catalogue and Index itself.
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Image: Cataloguing Models Anglo-American cataloguers learn in 2015, table 1 from the article.

Posted in August 2015.

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